The Urban Inquirer
A blog produced by students at Queens College, CUNY
WHO’S AFFECTED MORE?

We all hear how global warming and other issues are becoming a threat to our  environment. Now is that true? That may be a hard question for you to answer because of the influence of politics on our world today. We have people saying that indeed global warming, along with many other  environmental issues are becoming severe and that we must take action immediately . At  the other end, we have people saying that this issue of global warming is just a myth and it isn’t true. So who exactly is right? In my opinion, I don’t think the answer to that question really matters. Instead, the question I believe is more important to ask is “who will be affected and suffer more from environmental issues? If you think about it, not everyone can account for the changes that may come and so what do the people in poverty do? Countries around the world will be impacted tremendously by climate change because they don’t have the money and resources to adapt to this time of change. Considering that these places around the world are already very hot, they do not have the resources to compensate for something severe as this. The main issue is that people that are wealthy and have resources can limit and decrease the amount they are affected by these issues. So what about the less fortunate people who can’t move to more sanitary neighborhoods. Should they have to face the issues and deal with the health risks because they can’t afford to move to a more clean neighborhood? It doesn’t seem fair that their health should be risked because of their financial situations. Instead why can’t all places have equal treatment. Neighborhoods that are seen as “poor” should be able to have their garbage picked up just as quickly as a more “rich” neighborhood would be. If factors such as race and class continue to be taken into account when dealing with issues like this, then how will we ever move towards a more equal and safer society? Social class and race shouldn’t be the factors in which determines whether or not we get to suffer these type of environmental issues.

Burning Discarded Automobile Batteries, 07/1972

3 Comments to “WHO’S AFFECTED MORE?”

  1. Judy Wu says:

    Hello!
    I agree with you about the poor neighborhoods not having sanitary living while rich neighborhoods having quicker pick up of their garbage. I like it when you stated ” If factors such as race and class continue to be taken into account when dealing with issues like this, then how will we ever move towards a more equal and safer society?” I think what you said is really meaningful and it really describes how our society is today.

  2. Forrest Bonolo says:

    Quoting you: “Social class and race shouldn’t be the factors in which determines whether or not we get to suffer these type of environmental issues.” In addition to this, the response times for governmental assistance should be the same, because if we start looking at who should or shouldn’t receive help based on socio-economic status, there will be increased inequality in today’s society. You did a great job on this article. Only thing I would touch up on is the grammar. Otherwise great job.

  3. Sekai Dolin says:

    This is a good blog post, I agree. I like how you mentioned the people that will be the least affected are the people with more resources. In turn, that could be why many well-off people are not taking these environmental issues seriously.

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